TRANSFORM happened!

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How do you describe the indescribable?

Last week, Agile hosted the TRANSFORM unconference in Normandy, France. We were there to talk about the open suburface stack — the collection of open-source Python tools for earth scientists. We also spent time on the state of the Software Underground, a global community of practice for digital subsurface scientists and engineers. In effect, this was the first annual Software Underground conference. This was SwungCon 1.

The space

I knew the Château de Rosay was going to be nice. I hoped it was going to be very nice. But it wasn’t either of those things. It exceeded expectations by such a large margin, it seemed a little… indulgent, Excessive even. And yet it was cheaper than a Hilton, and you couldn’t imagine a more perfect place to think and talk about the future of open source geoscience, or a more productive environment in which to write code with new friends and colleagues.

It turns out that a 400-year-old château set in 8 acres of parkland in the heart of Normandy is a great place to create new things. I expect Gustave Flaubert and Guy de Maupassant thought the same when they stayed there 150 years ago. The forty-two bedrooms house exactly the right number of people for a purposeful scientific meeting.

This is frustrating, I’m not doing the place justice at all.

The work

This was most people’s first experience of an unconference. It was undeniably weird walking into a week-long meeting with no schedule of events. But, despite being inexpertly facilitated by me, the 26 participants enthusiastically collaborated to create the agenda on the first morning. With time, we appreciated the possibilities of the open space — it lets the group talk about exactly what it needs to talk about, exactly when it needs to talk about it.

The topics ranged from the governance and future of the Software Underground, to the possibility of a new open access journal, interesting new events in the Software Underground calendar, new libraries for geoscience, a new ‘core’ library for wells and seismic, and — of course — machine learning. I’ll be writing more about all of these topics in the coming weeks, and there’s already lots of chatter about them on the Software Underground Slack (which hit 1500 members yesterday!).

The food

I can’t help it. I have to talk about the food.

…but I’m not sure where to start. The full potential of food — to satisfy, to delight, to start conversations, to impress, to inspire — was realized. The food was central to the experience, but somehow not even the most wonderful thing about the experience of eating at the chateau. Meals were prefaced by a presentation by the professionals in the kitchen. No dish was repeated… indeed, no seating arrangement was repeated. The cheese was — if you are into cheese — off the charts.

There was a professionalism and thoughtfulness to the dining that can perhaps only be found in France.

Sorry everyone. This was one of those occasions when you had to be there. If you weren’t there, you missed out. I wish you’d been there. You would have loved it.

The good news is that it will happen again. Stay tuned.

What's happening at TRANSFORM?

Last week, I laid out the case for naming and focusing on an open subsurface stack. To this end, we’re hosting TRANSFORM, an unconference, in May. At TRANSFORM, we’ll be mapping out the present state of things, imagining the future, and starting to build it together. You’re invited.

This week, I want to tell you a bit more about what’s happening at the unconference.

BYOS: Bring Your Own Session

We’ll be using an unconference model. If you come to the event, I ask you to prepare a 45 to 60 minute ‘slot’. You can do whatever you like in your slot, the only requirements are that it’s somewhat aligned with the theme (rocks, computers, and openness), and that it produces something tangible. For example:

  • Start with a short presentation, maybe two, then hold a discussion. Capture the debate.

  • Hold a brainstorming session, generating ideas for new technology. Record the ideas.

  • Host a short sprint around a piece of existing software, checking code into GitHub.

  • Research the available open tools for a particular workflow or file type. Report back.

Really, anything is possible. There’s no need to propose topics ahead of time (but please feel free to discuss them in the #transform channel on the Software Underground). We’ll be gathering all the topics and organizing the schedule for Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday on Sunday evening and Monday morning. It’s just-in-time conferencing!

After the unconference, then the sprints

By the end of Wednesday, we should have a very good idea of what’s in the open subsurface stack, and what is missing. On Thursday and Friday, we’ll have the opportunity to build things. In small team, we can take on all sorts of things:

  • Improving the documentation of a project.

  • Writing tutorials or course material for existing tools.

  • Writing tests for an old or new project.

  • Adding functionality to an old project, or even starting a new project.

By the end of Friday, we should have a big pile of new stuff to play with, and lots of new threads to follow after the event.

Here’s a first-draft, high-level view of the schedule so far…

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The open subsurface stack

Two observations:

  1. Agile has been writing about open source software for geology and geophysics for several years now (for example here in 2011 and here in 2016). Progress is slow. There are lots of useful tools, but lots of gaps too. Some new tools have appeared, others have died. Conclusion: a robust and trusted open stack is not going to magically appear.

  2. People — some of them representing large corporations — are talking more than ever about industry collaboration. Open data platofrms are appearing all over the place. And several times at the DigEx conference in Oslo last week I heard people talk about open source and open APIs. Some organizations, notably Equinor, seem to really mean business. Conclusion: there seems to be a renewed appetite for open source subsurface software.

A quick reminder of what ‘open’ means; paraphrasing The Open Definition and The Open Source Definition in a sentence:

Open data, content and code can be freely used, modified, and shared by anyone for any purpose.

The word ‘open’ is being punted around quite a bit recently, but you have to read the small print in our business. Just as OpenWorks is not ‘open’ by the definition above, neither is OpenSpirit (remember that?), nor the Open Earth Community. (I’m not trying to pick on Halliburton but the company does seem drawn to the word, despite clearly not quite understanding it.)

The conditions are perfect

Earlier I said that a robust and trusted ‘stack’ (a collection of software that, ideally, does all the things we need) is not going to magically appear. What do I mean by ‘robust and trusted’? It goes far beyond ‘just code’ — writing code is the easy bit. It means thoroughly tested, carefully documented, supported, and maintained. All that stuff takes work, and work takes people and time. And people and time mean money.

Two more observations:

  1. Agile has been teaching geocomputing like crazy — 377 people in the last year. In our class, the participants install a lot of Python libraries, including a few from the open subsurface stack: segyio, lasio, welly, and bruges. Conclusion: a proto-stack exists already, hundreds of users exist already, and some training and support exist already.

  2. The Software Underground has over 1200 members (you should sign up, it’s free!). That’s a lot of people that care passionately about computers and rocks. The Python and machine learning communies are especially active. Conclusion: we have a community of talented scientists and developers that want to get good science done.

So what’s missing? What’s stopping us from taking open source subsurface tech to the next level?

Nothing!

Nothing is stopping us. And I’ve reached the conclusion that we need to provide care and feeding to this proto-stack, and this needs to start now. This is what the TRANSFORM 2019 unconference is going to be about. About 40 of us (you’re invited!) will spend five days working on some key questions:

  • What libraries are in the Python ‘proto-stack’? What kind of licenses do they have? Who are the maintainers?

  • Do we need a core library for the stack? Something to manage some basic data structures, units of measure, etc.

  • What are we calling it, who cares about it, and how are we going to work together?

  • Who has the capacity to provide attention, developer time, existing code, or funds to the stack?

  • Where are the gaps in the stack, and which ones need to be filled first?

We won’t finish all this at the unconference. But we’ll get started. We’ll produce a lot of ideas, plans, roadmaps, GitHub issues, and new code. If that sounds like fun to you, and you can contribute something to this work — please come. We need you there! Get more info and sign up here.


Read the follow-up post >>> What’s happening at TRANSFORM?


Thumbnail photo of the Old Man of Hoy by Tom Bastin, CC-BY on Flickr.

TRANSFORM 2019

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Yesterday I announced that we’re hatching a new plan. The next thing. Today I want to tell you about it.

The project has the codename TRANSFORM. I like the notion of transforms: functions that move you from one domain to another. Fourier transforms. Wavelet transforms. Digital subsurface transforms. Examples:

  • The transformative effect of open source software on subsurface science. Open source accelerates our work!

  • The transformative effect of collaborative, participatory events on the community. We can make new things!

  • The transformative effect of training on ourselves and our peers. Lots of us have new superpowers!

Together, we’ve built the foundation for a new, open software platform.

A domain shift

We think it’s time to refocus the hackathons as sprints — purposefully producing a sustainable, long-lasting, high quality, open source software stack that we can all use and combine into new tools, whether open or proprietary, free or commercial.

We think it’s time to bring a full-featured unconference into the mix. The half-day ‘unsessions’ open too many paths, and leave too few explored. We need more time — to share research, plan software projects, and write code.

Together, we can launch a new era in scientific computing for the subsurface.

At the core of this new era core is a new open-source software stack, created, maintained, and implemented by a community of scientists and organizations passionate about its potential.

Sign up!

Here’s the plan. We’re hosting an unconference from 5 to 11 May 2019, with full days from Monday to Friday. The event will take place at the Château de Rosay, near Rouen, France. It will be fully residential and fully catered. We have room for about 45 participants.

The goal is to lay down a road map for designing, funding, and building an open source software stack for subsurface. In the coming days and weeks, we will formulate the plan for the week, with input from the Software Underground. We want to hear from you. Propose a session! Host a sprint! Offer a bounty! There are lots of ways to get involved.

Map data: GeoBasis-DE / BKG / Google, photo: Chateauform. Click to enlarge.

If you want to be part of this effort, as a developer, an end-user, or a sponsor, then we invite you to join us.

The unconference fee will be EUR 1000, and accommodation and food will be EUR 1500. The student fees will be EUR 240 and EUR 360. There will be at least 5 bursaries of EUR 1000 available.

For the time being, we will be accepting early commitments, with a deposit of EUR 400 to secure a place (students wishing to register now should get in touch). Soon, you will be able to sign up online… we are working on a smooth process. In the meantime, click here to register your interest, share ideas for content, or sign up by paying a deposit.

Thanks for reading. We look forward to figuring this out together.


I’m delighted to be able to announce that we already have support from Dell EMC. Thanks as ever to David Holmes for his willingness to fund experiments!


In the US or Canada? Don’t despair! There will be a North American edition in Quebec in late September.

The next thing

Over the last several years, Agile has been testing some of the new ways of collaborating, centered on digital connections:

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  • It all started with this blog, which started in 2010 with my move from Calgary to Nova Scotia. It’s become a central part of my professional life, but we’re all about collaboration and blogs are almost entirely one-way, so…

  • In 2011 we launched SubSurfWiki. It didn’t really catch on, although it was a good basis for some other experiments and I still use it sometimes. Still, we realized we had to do more to connect the community, so…

  • In 2012 we launched our 52 Things collaborative, open access book series. There are well over 5000 of these out in the wild now, but it made us crave a real-life, face-to-face collaboration, so…

  • In 2013 we held the first ‘unsession’, a mini-unconference, at the Canada GeoConvention. Over 50 people came to chat about unsolved problems. We realized we needed a way to actually work on problems, so…

  • Later that year, we followed up with the first geoscience hackathon. Around 15 or so of us gathered in Houston for a weekend of coding and tacos. We realized that the community needed more coding skills, so…

  • In 2014 we started teaching a one-day Python course aimed squarely at geoscientists. We only teach with subsurface data and algorithms, and the course is now 5 days long. We now needed a way to connect all these new hackers and coders, so…

  • In 2014, together with Duncan Child, we also launched Software Underground, a chat room for discussing topics related to the earth and computers. Initially it was a Google Group but in 2015 we relaunched it as an open Slack team. We wanted to double down on scientific computing, so…

  • In 2015 and 2016 we launched a new web app, Pick This (returning soon!), and grew our bruges and welly open source Python projects. We also started building more machine learning projects, and getting really good at it.

Growing and honing

We have spent the recent years growing and honing these projects. The blog gets about 10,000 readers a month. The sixth 52 Things book is on its way. We held two public unsessions this year. The hackathons have now grown to 60 or so hackers, and have had about 400 participants in total, and five of them this year already (plus three to come!). We have also taught Python to 400 geoscientists, including 250 this year alone. And the Software Underground has over 1000 members.

In short, geoscience has gone digital, and we at Agile are grateful and excited to be part of it. At no point in my career have I been more optimistic and energized than I am right now.

So it’s time for the next thing.

The next thing is starting with a new kind of event. The first one is 5 to 11 May 2019, and it’s happening in France. I’ll tell you all about it tomorrow.

Café con leche

At the weekend, 28 digital geoscientists gathered at MAZ Café in Santa Ana, California, to sprint on some open geophysics software projects. Teams and individuals pushed pull requests — code contributions to open source projects — left, right, and centre. Meanwhile, Senah and her team at MAZ kept us plied with coffee and horchata, with fantastic food on the side.

Because people were helping each other and contributing where they could, I found it a bit hard to stay on top of what everyone was working on. But here are some of the things I heard at the project breakdown on Sunday afternoon:

Gerard Gorman, Navjot Kukreja, Fabio Luporini, Mathias Louboutin, and Philipp Witte, all from the devito project, continued their work to bring Kubernetes cluster management to devito. Trying to balance ease of use and unlimited compute turns out to be A Hard Problem! They also supported the other teams hacking on devito.

Thibaut Astic (UBC) worked on implementing DC resistivity models in devito. He said he enjoyed the expressiveness of devito’s symbolic equation definitions, but that there were some challenges with implementing the grad, div, and curl operator matrices for EM.

Vitor Mickus and Lucas Cavalcante (Campinas) continued their work implementing a CUDA framework for devito. Again, all part of the devito project trying to give scientists easy ways to scale to production-scale datasets.

That wasn’t all for devito. Alongside all these projects, Stephen Alwon worked on adapting segyio to read shot records, Robert Walker worked on poro-elastic models for devito, and Mohammed Yadecuri and Justin Clark (California Resources) contributed too. On the second day, the devito team was joined by Felix Hermann (now Georgia Tech), with Mengmeng Yang, and Ali Siakoohi (both UBC). Clearly there’s something to this technology!

Brendon Hall and Ben Lasscock (Enthought) hacked on an open data portal concept, based on the UCI Machine Learning Repository, coincidentally based just down the road from our location. The team successfully got some examples of open data and code snippets working.

Jesper Dramsch (Heriot-Watt), Matteo Niccoli (MyCarta), Yuriy Ivanov (NTNU) and Adriana Gordon and Volodymyr Vragov (U Calgary), hacked on bruges for the weekend, mostly on its documentation and the example notebooks in the in-bruges project. Yuriy got started on a ray-tracing code for us.

Nathan Jones (California Resources) and Vegard Hagen (NTNU) did some great hacking on an interactive plotting framework for geoscience data, based on Altair. What they did looked really polished and will definitely come in useful at future hackathons.

All in all, an amazing array of projects!

This event was low-key compared to recent hackathons, and I enjoyed the slightly more relaxed atmosphere. The venue was also incredibly supportive, making my life very easy.

A big thank you as always to our sponsors, Dell EMC and Enthought. The presence of the irrepressible David Holmes and Chris Lenzsch (both Dell EMC), and Enthought’s new VP of Energy, Charlie Cosad, was greatly appreciated.

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We will definitely be revisiting the sprint concept in the future einmal ist keinmal, as they say. Devito and bruges both got a boost from the weekend, and I think all the developers did too. So stay tuned for the next edition!

What is a sprint?

In October we're hosting our first 'code sprint'! What is that?

A code sprint is a type of hackathon, in which efforts are focused around a small number of open source projects. They are related to, but not really the same as, sprints in the Scrum software development framework. They are non-competitive — the only goal is to improve the software in question, whether it's adding functionality, fixing bugs, writing tests, improving documentation, or doing any of the other countless things that good software needs. 

On 13 and 14 October, we'll be hacking on 3 projects:

  • Devito: a high-level finite difference library for Python. Devito featured in three Geophysical Tutorials at the end of 2017 and beginning of 2018 (see Witte et al. for Part 3). The project needs help with code, tests, model examples, and documentation. There will be core devs from the project at the sprint. GitHub repo is here.
  • Bruges: a simple collection of Python functions representing basic geophysical equations. We built this library back in 2015, and have been chipping away ever since. It needs more equations, better docs, and better tests — and the project is basic enough for anyone to contribute to it, even a total Python newbie. GitHub repo is here.
  • G3.js: a JavaScript wrapper for D3.js, a popular plotting toolkit for web developers. When we tried to adapt D3.js to geoscience data, we found we wanted to simplify basic tasks like making vertical plots, and plotting raster-like data (e.g. seismic) with line plots on top (e.g. horizons). Experience with JavaScript is a must. GitHub repo is here.

The sprint will be at a small joint called MAZ Café Con Leche, located in Santa Ana about 10 km or 15 minutes from the Anaheim Convention Center where the SEG Annual Meeting is happening the following week.

Thank you, as ever, to our fantastic sponsors: Dell EMC and Enthought. These two companies are powered by amazing people doing amazing things. I'm very grateful to them both for being such enthusiastic champions of the change we're working for in our science and our industry. 

If you like the sound of spending the weekend coding, talking geophysics, and enjoying the best coffee in southern California, please join us at the Geophysics Sprint! Register on Eventbrite and we'll see you there.

Lots of news!

I can't believe it's been a month since my last post! But I've now recovered from the craziness of the spring — with its two hackathons, two conferences, two new experiments, as well as the usual courses and client projects — and am ready to start getting back to normal. My goal with this post is to tell you all the exciting stuff that's happened in the last few weeks.

Meet our newest team member

There's a new Agilist! Robert Leckenby is a British–Swiss geologist with technology tendencies. Rob has a PhD in Dynamic characterisation and fluid flow modelling of fractured reservoirs, and has worked in various geoscience roles in large and small oil & gas companies. We're stoked to have him in the team!

Rob lives near Geneva, Switzerland, and speaks French and several other human languages, as well as Python and JavaScript. He'll be helping us develop and teach our famous Geocomputing course, among other things. Reach him at robert@agilescientific.com.

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Geocomputing Summer School

We have trained over 120 geoscientists in Python so far this year, but most of our training is in private classes. We wanted to fix that, and offer the Geocomputing class back for anyone to take. Well, anyone in the Houston area :) It's called Summer School, it's happening the week of 13 August, and it's a 5-day crash course in scientific Python and the rudiments of machine learning. It's designed to get you a long way up the learning curve. Read more and enroll. 


A new kind of event

We have several more events happening this year, including hackathons in Norway and in the UK. But the event in Anaheim, right before the SEG Annual Meeting, is going to be a bit different. Instead of the usual Geophysics Hackathon, we're going to try a sprint around open source projects in geophysics. The event is called the Open Geophysics Sprint, and you can find out more here on events.agilescientific.com.

That site — events.agilescientific.com — is our new events portal, and our attempt to stay on top of the community events we are running. Soon, you'll be able to sign up for events on there too (right now, most of them are still handled through Eventbrite), but for now it's at least a place to see everything that's going on. Thanks to Diego for putting it together!

Weekend worship in Salt Lake City

The Salt Lake City hackathon — only the second we've done with a strong geology theme — is a thing of history, but you can still access the event page to check out who showed up and who did what. (This events page is a new thing we launched in time for this hackathon; it will serve as a public document of what happens at our events, in addition to being a platform for people to register, sponsor, and connect around our events.) 

In true seat-of-the-pants hackathon style we managed to set up an array of webcams and microphones to record the finale. The demos are the icing on the cake. Teams were selected at random and were given 4 minutes to wow the crowd. Here is the video, followed by a summary of what each team got up to... 


Unconformist.ai

Didi Ooi (University of Bristol), Karin Maria Eres Guardia (Shell), Alana Finlayson (UK OGA), Zoe Zhang (Chevron). The team used machine learning the automate the mapping of unconformities in subsurface data. One of the trickiest parts is building up a catalog of data-model pairs for GANs to train on. Instead of relying on thousand or hundreds of thousands of human-made seismic interpretations, the team generated training images by programmatically labelling pixels on synthetic data as being either above (white) or below (black) the unconformity. Project pageSlides.

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Outcrops Gee Whiz

Thomas Martin (soon Colorado School of Mines), Zane Jobe (Colorado School of Mines), Fabien Laugier (Chevron), and Ross Meyer (Colorado School of Mines). The team wrote some programs to evaluate facies variability along drone-derived digital outcrop models. They did this by processing UAV point cloud data in Python and classified different rock facies using using weather profiles, local cliff face morphology, and rock colour variations as attributes. This research will help in the development drone assisted 3D scanning to automate facies boundaries mapping and rock characterization. RepoSlides.

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Jet Loggers

Eirik Larsen and Dimitrios Oikonomou (Earth Science Analytics), and Steve Purves (Euclidity). This team of European geoscientists, with their circadian clocks all out of whack, investigated if a language of stratigraphy can be extracted from the rock record and, if so, if it can be used as another tool for classifying rocks. They applied natural language processing (NLP) to an alphabetic encoding of well logs as a means to assist or augment the labour-intensive tasks of classifying stratigraphic units and picking tops. Slides.

 

 

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Book Cliffs Bandits

Tom Creech (ExxonMobil) and Jesse Pisel (Wyoming State Geological Survey). The team started munging datasets in the Book Cliffs. Unfortunately, they really did not have the perfect, ready to go data, and by the time they pivoted to some workable open data from Alaska, their team name had already became a thing. The goal was build a tool to assist with lithology and stratigraphic correlation. They settled on change-point detection using Bayesian statistics, which they were using to build richer feature sets to test if it could produce more robust automatic stratigraphic interpretation. Repo, and presentation.

 

 

A channel runs through it

Nam Pham (UT Austin), Graham Brew (Dynamic Graphics), Nathan Suurmeyer (Shell). Because morphologically realistic 3D synthetic seismic data is scarce, this team wrote a Python program that can take seismic horizon interpretations from real data, then construct richer training data sets for building an AI that can automatically delineate geological entities in the subsurface. The pixels enclosed by any two horizons are labelled with ones, pixels outside this region are labelled with zeros. This work was in support of Nam's thesis research which is using the SegNet architecture, and aims to extract not only major channel boundaries in seismic data, but also the internal channel structure and variability – details that many seismic interpreters, armed even with state-of-the art attribute toolboxes, would be unable to resolve. Project page, and code.

GeoHacker

Malcolm Gall (UK OGA), Brendon Hall and Ben Lasscock (Enthought). Innovation happens when hackers have the ability to try things... but they also need data to try things out on. There is a massive shortage of geoscience datasets that have been staged and curated for machine learning research. Team Geohacker's project wasn't a project per se, but a platform aimed at the sharing, distribution, and long-term stewardship of geoscience data benchmarks. The subsurface realm is swimming with disparate data types across a dizzying range of length scales, and indeed community efforts may be the only way to prove machine-learning's usefulness and keep the hype in check. A place where we can take geoscience data, and put it online in a ready-to-use for for machine learning. It's not only about being open, online and accessible. Good datasets, like good software, need to be hosted by individuals, properly documented, enriched with tutorials and getting-started guides, not to mention properly funded. Website.

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Petrodict

Mark Mlella (Univ. Louisiana, Lafayette), Matthew Bauer (Anchutz Exploration), Charley Le (Shell), Thomas Nguyen (Devon). Petrodict is a machine-learning driven, cloud-based lithology prediction tool that takes petrophysics measurements (well logs) and gives back lithology. Users upload a triple combo log to the app, and the app returns that same log with with volumetric fractions for it's various lithologic or mineralogical constituents. For training, the team selected several dozen wells that had elemental capture spectroscopy (ECS) logs – a premium tool that is run only in a small fraction of wells – as well as triple combo measurements to build a model for predicting lithology. Repo.

Seismizor

George Hinkel, Vivek Patel, and Alex Waumann (all from University of Texas at Arlington). Earthquakes are hard. This team of computer science undergraduate students drove in from Texas to spend their weekend with all the other geo-enthusiasts. What problem in subsurface oil and gas did they identify as being important, interesting, and worthy of their relatively unvested attention? They took on the problem of induced seismicity. To test whether machine learning and analytics can be used to predict the likelihood that injected waste water from fracking will cause an earthquake like the ones that have been making news in Oklahoma. The majority of this team's time was spent doing what all good scientists do –understanding the physical system they were trying to investigate – unabashedly pulling a number of the more geomechanically inclined hackers from neighbouring teams and peppering them with questions. Induced seismicity is indeed a complex phenomenon, but George's realization that, "we massively overestimated the availability of data", struck a chord, I think, with the judges and the audience. Another systemic problem. The dynamic earth – incredible in its complexity and forces – coupled with the fascinating and politically charged technologies we use for drilling and fracking might be one of the hardest problems for machine learning to attack in the subsurface. 


AAPG next year is in San Antonio. If it runs, the hackathon will be 18–19 of May. Mark your calendar and stay tuned!

Strategies for a revolution

This must be a record. It has taken me several months to get around to recording the talk I gave last year at EAGE in Vienna — Strategies for a revolution. Rather a gradiose title, sorry about that, especially over-the-top given that I was preaching to the converted: the workshop on open source. I did, at least, blog aobut the goings on in the workshop itself at the time. I even followed it up with a slightly cheeky analysis of the discussion at the event. But I never posted my own talk, so here it is:

Too long didn't watch? No worries, my main points were:

  1. It's not just about open source code. We must write open access content, put our data online, and push the whole culture towards openness and reproducibility. 
  2. We, as researchers, professionals, and authors, need to take responsibility for being more open in our practices. It has to come from within the community.
  3. Our conferences need more tutorials, bootcamps, , hackathons and sprints. These events build skills and networks much faster than (just) lectures and courses.
  4. We need something like an Open Geoscience Foundation to help streamline funding channels for open source projects and community events.

If you depend on open source software, or care about seeing more of it in our field, I'd love to hear your thoughts about how we might achieve the goal of having greater (scientific, professional, societal) impact with technology. Please leave a comment.